Monday, July 8, 2013

Winslow's Tea Story



Tasha Tudor started her garden in Vermont nearly fifty years ago, yet brought to it many decades of prior knowledge and experience. It is a very old garden created with much wisdom. Pleasing to the eye, it possesses plants and a purpose beyond visual appeal. She called it “just a good messy garden.” 


    
 In spring daffodils, tulips, crabapples, violets and dandelions suffuse with color above new, unmown grass. By June peonies and campanula bloom among an ever rising tide of roses. Most of the plants have a story to tell, a thread of memory or a connection to Tasha’s family.


The blue and white campanula while not rare do not seem to be available in nurseries. They, along with the perennial hollyhocks, came from Tasha’s grandfather. 
 

Some plants are a mystery. The rose growing against the stone wall and a pear tree in the orchard remain unidentified. Tasha sought their names over the years, but did not seem to mind when they were not to be found.

   
        Tasha said: “Because I gardened as a little girl, and my mother and grandmother were passionate gardeners before me, I grew up with flowers, knew them by their look and feel, and called them by all their old colloquial names. Dame’s rocket, sweet William, monkshood, and meadow rue.”


She picked herbs spring and summer for cooking. With a basket and long scissors she collected thyme, sage, a few leaves from the bay tree, parsley and chives for soup, and mint to float in iced tea on hot days on the front porch. Behind the house close to the gate she picked current berries for jam.

 Tasha attributed her happiness and longevity to gardening, and spent every possible moment among her plants, and often said that gardening has untold rewards.


Stories and photos copyright Winslow Tudor, July 2013

20 comments:

  1. Thank you for this new Tea Story. You know I love them, Winslow, and am so glad you are continuing them.

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    1. Cathy, sharing them here on the blog instead of on the website makes things much more streamlined, which (hopefully!) means more stories from Winslow :-)

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  2. Nothing is more beautiful than a cottage garden tended with just enough freedom to be abundant. Thank you for the beautiful photographs.

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  3. Just Lovely...thanks so much for sharing. How blessed you are to live around all Tasha's beauty :) I wonder if her garden misses her,but of course! Blessings

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  4. It's so very lovely.

    Susan

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  5. *****we do miss tasha!!! one day we will meet again somewhere east of vermont
    and west of new hampshire! tom and barbara

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  6. Love these photos of Tasha's garden----so pretty!!! You mentioned a mystery rose under one of the pictures----is this picture THE mystery rose Tasha so often spoke of??? Love, your tea stories, Winslow---keep up the good work. Always a TUDOR fan, Joyce

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  7. That gift most beautiful left us Tasha. In a world as live us in which everything is "advances", only a few (I think that fortunately we are not so few), we see that true happiness lies in the simple life, between your plants, in your kitchen, on a porch looking at the stars on a quiet night, in front of the fire's home doing a patchwork job while the snow falls outside... This is the message that I see in every moment of the life of Tasha. Thank you very much for continuing its tradition, to show us all that you follow those always wonderful photos.
    A very strong hug.
    Mª Carmen Duque

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  9. What a delightful blog. The roses are gorgeous. Would you please consider adding the gadget to allow someone to follow by email subscription? It makes it so much easier to keep up with favorite blogs. Thank you.

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    1. I second that request!! Thank you & blessings,
      Lois

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  10. So lovely and peaceful. My daughter and I have a small garden behind our rowhouse. It's home to a bunny, and many birds, including a baby hummingbird. I've been following Tasha since I first discovered one of her book at a daycare center over 30 yrs ago!!! My daughter grew up knowing and loving her, too. We're all creative and artsy and when things are tough, it's the memories of Tasha that often see us through!! I just wish I'd get a chippy hackey out back!!!! :)

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  11. Such beautiful photos!

    I will have to send you my Goat's Milk and Gardening (Eliza's Tale for Spring)....Ellie and Baby Katie need a set of books from Grammy's House. I will have to get to it:)
    Much love,
    Christie

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  12. Natalie, thank you for your nice blog. Winslow, never stop writing your wonderful tea stories. There is a marvelous peace that I get when you share your and Tasha's world. Kiss your beautiful little girls for us all. Have a great and beautiful Fall.

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  13. Tasha Tudor has been an enormous influence in my life eversince discovering her work in a Children's Literature class in college in 1963. Over the years we corresponded and she made lovely gift cards for our family which have been treasured. We happily shared them with the Museum when it opened to show visitors that Tasha was a truly authentic and most extraordinary person. What a joy to celebrate her life and her birthday.
    nafordatsbcglobal.net

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  14. Oh Winslow, please continue your glimpses and meditations upon our Tasha....
    walking through her beautiful garden, sipping tea by the fireside, being enchanted by her doll house, or just setting in her kitchen as she slowly, but efficiently conjures up a delectable dish, puts our world into right perspective once again. She restores us at every turn. We shall never see
    her like again. May she prevail through your opening door to her world.
    Gentility

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  15. I have visited highly organized gardens and lovely historic homes that leave me breathless, but none can even hold a candle to Tasha's home and garden. I have been so fortunate to have had the pleasure to visit her home and gardens twice now and I still yearn for more. I adore Winslow's writings and equally so, Natalie's posts. It is always a comforting feeling to come to this site and feast one's eyes and instantly attain a deep-seated feeling of peace. Thank you!

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